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RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — Brazil's government says a hacker breached the Twitter account of the nation's federal police and posted false word that there was a bomb threat in the World Cup stadium where Brazil took on Chile.

The hacked message was posted about an hour before kickoff Saturday and said that there "was a confirmed bomb threat" in the stadium in the city of Belo Horizonte, and that "an evacuation is not being ruled out."

The office of the Brazilian presidency said on its own Twitter account about an hour later that the message was false. The fake message was removed.

Brazil's government websites and those related to the World Cup have been targeted by hackers in recent weeks. But nobody immediately took credit for this incident.



SAO PAULO (AP) — Sao Paulo's typically raucous Avenida Paulista was particularly subdued Saturday morning.

"I'm very nervous," said Munuel Freitas, a 21-year-old Brazilian quietly standing outside a major shopping center adorned with a giant flag of Brazil. "Chile is not an easy team. It is going to be difficult."

All along the thoroughfare there were equally jittery Brazilians preparing to watch their country's first World Cup knockout game. As kickoff time approached, the streets emptied as rabid fans flocked to bars, restaurants — and mostly the sanctuary of their own homes. Aside from the Elvis impersonator belting out drawled hits in a Brazilian-themed jumpsuit, all was quiet as pedestrians seemed to be consumed by their own thoughts.

"I want them to win, of course, but I don't trust our team," said Daniela Arce, 38, wearing the almost mandatory yellow Brazil team jersey. "They think they are all stars, and we think we are the greatest, and we have to win because we are home. But most of the World Cups we did not win."

She likened the political atmosphere around the games to that at the 1970 tournament, when a Brazil title lifted the spirit of a country in the middle of a military dictatorship. Should Brazil lose, many fear that the wide scale protests that accompanied the heavily criticized preparations will resume.

— By Aron Heller — www.twitter.com/aronhellerap



BELO HORIZONTE, Brazil (AP) — Banks and car dealerships near the Mineirao Stadium in Belo Horizonte had their windows boarded up in fear of protests before Brazil's match against Chile in the second round of the World Cup on Saturday.

Owners took the precautionary measure because several demonstrations against the billions of dollars spent on the World Cup were scheduled for the morning of the match in the southeastern city. Some banks near downtown, where protests have happened in the past, also had their facades boarded up overnight.

Belo Horizonte was home to some of the most violent protests during last year's Confederations Cup, the World Cup warm-up tournament in Brazil. Demonstrators trying to get near the stadium clashed with police, who had to use tear gas and rubber bullets to contain the several thousand protesters. Many banks and car dealerships in the area were destroyed.

— By Tales Azzoni — www.twitter.com/tazzoni


Associated Press reporters will be filing dispatches about happenings in and around Brazil during the 2014 World Cup. Follow AP journalists covering the World Cup on Twitter: https://twitter.com/AP_Sports/world-cup-2014

MOSCOW (AP) — The Interfax news agency is reporting that pro-Russian insurgents have released four European observers who they have held captive for weeks.

The news agency quoted the press service of the self-proclaimed Donetsk People's Republic as saying that the four observers from the Organization for Security and Cooperation in Europe have been freed and are en route to the eastern city of Donetsk.

The rebels released another group of the OSCE observers earlier this week.

NEW YORK (AP) — Online-streaming service Aereo Inc. is temporarily closing down its operation, three days after it was dealt an unfavorable ruling by the U.S. Supreme Court.

"We have decided to pause our operations temporarily as we consult with the court and map out our next steps," Aereo's Chief Executive Officer Chet Kanojia wrote in a letter to customers posted on its website Saturday.

"The spectrum that the broadcasters use to transmit over the air programming belongs to the American public and we believe you should have the right to access that live programming whether your antenna sits on the roof of your home, on top of your television or in the cloud."

The Supreme Court dealt Aereo, backed by Barry Diller, a major setback on Wednesday in ruling that the television-over-the-Internet service operates much like a cable TV company. As a result, the service violates copyright law unless Aereo pays broadcasters licensing fees for offering TV stations to customers' tablets, phones and other gadgets.

But although the Supreme Court expressed its thinking on the law, it's the U.S. District Court in New York that must issue a preliminary injunction stopping the service, as requested by broadcasters.

There might not be much legislation traveling down Pennsylvania Avenue for President Obama to sign, but there's plenty of back and forth over the president's use of executive power to act when Congress doesn't.

Week's end found Obama dismissing a lawsuit threatened by Speaker John Boehner, who alleges the president is violating the Constitution by exercising this often controversial power.

"You know, the suit is a stunt," Obama told ABC News' George Stephanopoulos in an interview. "... The majority of the American people want to see immigration reform done. We had a bipartisan bill through the Senate, and you're going to squawk if I try to fix some parts of it administratively that are within my authority while you are not doing anything?"

Boehner's press secretary, Michael Steel, shot back: "The American people, their elected representatives, and the Supreme Court have all expressed serious concerns about the President's failure to follow the Constitution. Dismissing them with words like, 'smidgen' or 'stunt' only reinforces their frustration."

Stunt or not, there are three things we can say about Obama resorting to executive action and the GOP lawsuit to challenge them.

The lawsuit fires up each party's respective bases: Since early in Obama's presidency, conservatives have accused the president of frequently exceeding his constitutional authority, even acting tyrannically. Presidential actions to address or delay parts the Affordable Care Act or to stop deportations of young immigrants who had no say in being brought by their parents to the U.S., have especially outraged conservatives.

The coming House Republican lawsuit taps into that anger and extends the conservative narrative of extra-constitutional presidential action. (That narrative was also furthered by the Supreme Court's 9-0 decision that found certain of the president's recess appointments to be unconstitutional.)

The House lawsuit provides yet another talking point for Republicans during their mid-term re-election campaigns as well as a new element for fundraising pitches.

But the lawsuit energizes not just the Republican base but Democrats too. The Democratic Congressional Campaign Committee said it had its best one-day of 2014 fundraising after Boehner announced, mid-week, that the House's intention to sue the president.

The public arguably supports executive actions: While the Republican base is fiercely opposed to Obama's executive actions, available polling suggests that Americans support the concept of a president acting unilaterally to achieve policy ends that can't be accomplished legislatively because of gridlock.

A 2011 poll commissioned by the Human Rights Campaign, for instance, found a majority of Americans across demographic groups supported the idea of an executive order to ban workplace discrimination against LGBT individuals. Earlier this June, the White House said Obama intended to sign such an executive order, which is now in the process being drafted.

Meanwhile, the president used executive actions during his first term, including his action to stop deportations and to provide work permits to certain young immigrants in the U.S. illegally and solidly won re-election after promising during the campaign to take action himself if Congress didn't come along.

Obama can point to such evidence of support as he and congressional Democrats continue to assert that executive action is better than doing nothing.

The House Republicans' lawsuit faces a reluctant judiciary: While the Supreme Court did step into the fight between the president and Senate Republicans over Obama's recess appointments to the National Labor Relations Board, giving conservatives a victory, the federal judiciary's larger tendency is to shy away from entering such inter-branch battles.

As court watcher Lyle Denniston explained in an informative post on the National Constitution Center's blog:

"Time after time, when members of Congress have sued in the courts, because the Executive Branch did something that they believe frustrated the will of Congress, they have been met at the door of the courthouse with a polite refusal to let them in. Failing to get their way in the skirmishing with the White House does not give members of Congress a right to take their grievance into court. Frustration does not make a real lawsuit, according to this notion."

NEW YORK (AP) — For the first time since researching her Pulitzer Prize-winning novel, "The Goldfinch," Donna Tartt is back in Las Vegas.

The occasion isn't work, but another literary honor as Tartt received this year's Andrew Carnegie Medal for Excellence in fiction Saturday.

Historian Doris Kearns Goodwin was the nonfiction winner for her book on the progressive era of the early 20th century, "The Bully Pulpit."

The medals each come with a $5,000 cash prize and were presented Saturday at the American Library Association's annual gathering in Las Vegas, where parts of "The Goldfinch" are set. The awards, founded in 2012, are managed by the library association and funded through a grant from the Carnegie Corp. of New York.

Tartt set some of "The Goldfinch" in Las Vegas, where a 13-year-old boy from New York City contends with his neglectful father. For Tartt, the award also helps uphold a family tradition: She is the niece and grandniece of librarians and as a teenager in Mississippi worked as a library aide. She wrote much of "The Goldfinch," which took a decade to complete, at the main branch of the New York Public Library.

"It took so long to write 'The Goldfinch' that I went through three different research librarians," Tartt said with a laugh during a recent telephone interview from her home in Virginia. She then recalled the importance of libraries during her childhood — whether it was the librarians who recommended books to her, or the books she recommended to patrons.

"You can really change someone's life by giving them the right book at the right time," she said. "All writers are readers before we write a word, so there's a kinship and it's very deep."

The Carnegie medal is also personal for Goodwin, who has vivid memories of borrowing books from her childhood library in Rockville Centre, New York, and reading them with her mother, who had rheumatic fever and was too weak to get books on her own. As with Tartt, libraries have been second homes for Goodwin throughout her career, from the research at the Library of Congress for "The Bully Pulpit" to her time at the Franklin Roosevelt presidential library in Hyde Park, New York, where she worked on her Pulitzer Prize-winning "No Ordinary Time."

"I loved how you had to leave your pocketbook outside and could only bring in a pencil," Goodwin said by telephone from her house in Concord, Massachusetts. "And then to have the chance to look through actual documents from World War II really made you feel you were back in that time."

Finalists for the Carnegie medal were Chimamanda Ngozi Adichie's "Americah" and Edwidge Danticat's "Claire of the Sea Light" for fiction and Nicholas A. Basbanes' "On Paper" and Sherri Fink's "Five Days at Memorial" for nonfiction. Each author receives $1,500.

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — With his family pedigree and a stout resume, Brendan Lemieux was sure he was a first-round pick.

One weekend into his NHL career, he already had first taste of disappointment when he was passed over on the first day of the draft. But he had a short wait on Saturday.

The Buffalo Sabres opened the second day of the draft by selecting the forward with the 31st overall pick.

"I expected to be a first-round pick and never even really looked at the second round," Lemieux said.

The Sabres are glad he was around. Lemieux is the son of former New Jersey Devils star and Stanley Cup champion Claude Lemieux.

Brendan Lemieux, who played for the Barrie Colts in the Ontario Hockey League, enjoyed comparisons to his father. In the weeks leading up to the draft, he said he took it as a compliment when teams said he reminded them of the player who won four Stanley Cups. He wears No. 21 because that was his father's number while playing junior hockey and he has also inherited the nickname "Pepe" from Claude.

Brendan Lemieux waited with each pick Friday night to hear his name called. He went home wondering why he would have to return to the Wells Fargo Center for rounds two through seven.

"I was one of those guys who was trying to figure out for a long time where I was going to go," he said. "Nobody really knew. I had no idea I would drop out of the first round, but I had no idea I was going to get picked this morning. I walked in the arena like 2 minutes before I was going to get picked."

Lemieux finished tied for third on Barrie with 53 points (27 goals) and led the club with 145 penalty minutes.

Lemieux was one of several offspring of former NHL players available in the draft. The Sabres selected center Sam Reinhart with the second overall pick. He is the son of former NHL player Paul Reinhart, who was selected by the Atlanta Flames in the first round in 1979.

The Florida Panthers selected defenseman Aaron Ekblad with the No. 1 overall pick Friday night. Lemieux and Ekblad were teammates at Barrie and expected to become linked again as first-round picks.

"Aaron knows how crushed I was last night that I didn't go," Lemieux said. "It was definitely a goal of mine to go in the first round, but I think he was really excited to see me go early today. Aaron is one of my best friends. He was my roommate. We're like brothers. I was really excited to see him go first yesterday. He definitely deserves it."

There was a run on goalies in the second round after none were selected in the first. Calgary selected Mason McDonald with the 34th overall pick. From there, goalies were the hot pick: Vancouver selected Thatcher Demko with the 36th pick, Carolina selected Alex Nedeljkovic at 37 and Washington drafted Vitek Vancek with the 39th pick.

SPARTA, Ky. (AP) — Brad Keselowski showed early and often that his No. 2 Ford was the best car at Kentucky Speedway, dominating the NASCAR Sprint Cup Series race Saturday night to become the track's first repeat winner.

The Penske Racing driver and 2012 race winner followed his record-breaking pole effort to lead 199 of 267 laps en route to his second victory of the season and 12th of his career.

Keselowski won from the pole for the first time, pulling away after rallying from sixth on a restart to chase down and pass leader Kyle Busch on Lap 248.

"Our car was awesome," said Keselowski, who has led a series-high 346 laps in four starts at Kentucky. "The team did a great job and I'm just really thankful to have a car this good. I don't know how else to put it."

Keselowski's postrace celebration was marred after he cut his right hand on a broken champagne bottle and was taken to the infield care center.

"We were playing around with some champagne and I told my good friend I should have stuck with beer," Keselowski joked after receiving four stitches. "We had too much fun with champagne and one of the bottles broke and I cut my hand open. It's no big deal."

Busch was second, followed by Ryan Newman, Matt Kenseth and Dale Earnhardt Jr., who rallied from a 29th-place start.

A night after dominating the Nationwide Series race before finishing second to Kevin Harvick, partly because of a pit-road speeding penalty, Keselowski saved his heavy foot for the bumpy, rough track. The 2012 Cup champion went on to win by 1.014 seconds and post his ninth top-10 this season in moving one spot to fourth in the standings.

Teammate Joey Logano started second and led 37 laps in a ninth-place effort while Busch led 31 in a race that featured 12 lead changes — all but one featuring Penske drivers.

"I felt like we were better than (Newman), but nowhere near as good as (Keselowski) or (Logano)," Busch said. "Those guys were really stout."

Keselowski, also the winner in Las Vegas, became the first driver this season with multiple victories on 1.5-mile tracks that make up much of the Chase for the Sprint Cup. The circuit won't see another such track until late August at Atlanta, and Keselowski made a case for being a favorite with arguably the most impressive run of his career.

It followed his track-record qualifying speed of 188.791 mph and 138 laps led in the Nationwide race, which also featured a furious late run before settling for second to Harvick, who was seventh in the 400-mile race. This time he had enough laps to pass Busch.

But the tone was set from the start, as Keselowski and Logano justified their front-row qualifying sweep with a vengeance. Keselowski wasted no time with that agenda, taking charge at the green flag and leading the first 78 laps before Logano took over for five laps.

The two traded leads from there with nobody else to challenge them until Aric Almirola's wreck brought the sixth caution on Lap 213.

That sent the leaders down pit road and scramble off produced the race's first non-Penske leader in Busch, whose No. 18 took over on Lap 217 and led the restart with Newman second.

The Penske duo needed just seven laps to draw a bead on both drivers and Keselowski was soon second and making a furious effort trying to chase down Busch, who had a 2-second lead at one point. Once Keselowski caught him in the backstretch, he again showed his Ford's superiority.

Earnhardt, Jimmie Johnson and Tony Stewart meanwhile overcame bad starting spots to finish in the top 11. Johnson was 10th after starting 25th and Stewart recovered from a 42nd-place start because of a transmission change for 11th. He had qualified 13th.

"I would have liked to have been a little better than what we were there at the end," Stewart said, "but I think we definitely had to fight our way up through the day. .. All in all I thought we had a pretty honest day there; can't complain about that."

Points leader Jeff Gordon finished sixth and leads Johnson and Earnhardt by 24.

PHILADELPHIA (AP) — A metal security gate detached from the facade of an Italian ice shop Saturday afternoon, killing a 3-year-old girl, police said.

The security door fell on the child at a Rita's Water Ice store in north Philadelphia at around 4:30 p.m., according to the Philadelphia Police Department. The girl was taken to Hahnemann University Hospital and died after arrival.

"Our hearts and prayers go out to the child's family," said Linda Duke, a spokeswoman for Rita's Italian Ice, the shop's parent company. "Due to the current investigation we really cannot comment about the unfortunate incident."

Photos from the scene show the black metal gate lying on the sidewalk, pink balloons still tied to it in front of the shop's red and white striped awning. Several popped balloons appear trapped underneath the gate, which businesses typically roll down after hours to prevent crime.

The child was there with her mother, according to WPVI-TV, and bystanders rushed to her aid while others gave CPR. Witnesses told the TV station a sorority and fraternity fundraiser was happening at the time.

"The gentlemen from Omega Psi Phi were holding the awning up and the little girl was on the ground and they were trying to resuscitate her," witness Kealy Dangerfield Enlow told the TV station.

Alison Brady, who lives across the street and saw the gate fall, told The Philadelphia Inquirer that stucco work had recently been done on the shop.

"It was almost like slow motion," she told the newspaper. "The gate was falling and people were screaming and it hit the ground and the little girl was there."

Officials with the Department of Licenses and Inspections were investigating.

The department told WCAU-TV that there were no open violations at the store and no reported problems with the gate. L&I said that they only inspect security gates if they receive a complaint.

HONOLULU (AP) — A former aspiring model who accused several Hollywood figures of sexually abusing him as a child dropped a third lawsuit on Saturday, leaving only one suit open against "X-Men" franchise director Bryan Singer.

Lawyers for Michael Egan III said in a federal court filing in Honolulu on Saturday morning that they were dismissing a lawsuit against theater producer Gary Wayne Goddard. Egan earlier dropped lawsuits against two television executives.

Egan's lawyers did not explain why they dropped the lawsuit in their two-page filing, saying only that the matter was dismissed without prejudice, meaning Egan can refile the lawsuit if he chooses.

Egan's lawyers, Jeff Herman and Mark Gallagher, as well as spokespersons for Goddard and Singer did not immediately return messages seeking comment from The Associated Press on Saturday.

Egan had accused the men of sexually abusing him as a child during trips to Hawaii in 1999 when he was 17 years old. He filed suit under an unusual state law that created a window for civil lawsuits in sex abuse cases where the statute of limitations has passed. The men have denied the allegations, and Singer has filed a motion to dismiss the lawsuit against him. A hearing is set in the Singer case for Aug. 4.

Earlier this week, Egan dropped a lawsuit against former network television executive Garth Ancier. Ancier responded Friday by filing a malicious-prosecution lawsuit against Egan, saying the accusations had damaged his reputation. Ancier said he never visited the estate in Hawaii where Egan claims he was abused.

Ancier is seeking punitive damages. He claimed he has already spent hundreds of thousands of dollars defending himself.


Oskar Garcia can be reached on Twitter at http://twitter.com/oskargarcia

America's Got Talent judges told the dancing hip-hop violinist Lindsey Stirling that her career had no hope, but she proved them wrong. She tells NPR's Scott Simon about her new album, Shatter Me.

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Libyan militant accused of masterminding the deadly Benghazi attacks that have become a flashpoint in U.S. politics awaited his first court appearance Saturday amid heightened security at the federal courthouse.

Ahmed Abu Khattala was scheduled to appear before a magistrate judge, according to the U.S. attorney's office. He is charged in connection with the assaults on the U.S. diplomatic compound in the eastern Libyan city on Sept. 11, 2012, that killed the U.S. ambassador and three other Americans.

U.S. special forces captured Abu Khattala in Libya two weeks ago, marking the first breakthrough in the investigation. Officials had been questioning Abu Khattala aboard a Navy ship that transported him to the United States.

Abu Khattala was flown early Saturday by military helicopter from the ship to a National Park Service landing pad in the city's Anacostia neighborhood, according to a U.S. official who was not authorized to discuss the transfer publicly and spoke on condition of anonymity.

The prosecution reflects the Obama administration's stated position of trying suspected terrorists in the American criminal justice system even as Republicans call for Abu Khattala and others to be held at the U.S. detention facility in Guantanamo Bay, Cuba.

Critics say suspected terrorists don't deserve the legal protections afforded by the American court. The administration considers the civilian justice system fairer and more efficient.

A criminal complaint filed last year and unsealed after Abu Khattala's capture charges him with terror-related crimes. They include killing a person during an attack on a federal facility; that crime can be punishable by death.

At the initial hearing, the government was expected to outline the charges against him. He almost certainly will remain in detention while the Justice Department seeks a federal grand jury indictment against him.

The violence in Libya on the 11th anniversary of the Sept. 11 attacks on the World Trade Center and the Pentagon quickly became a political controversy at home.

Republicans accused the White House, as the 2012 presidential election neared, of intentionally misleading the public about what prompted the attacks. The White House said Republicans were politicizing a national tragedy.

Abu Khattala was a prominent figure in Benghazi's circles of extremists. He was popular among young radicals and lived openly in the eastern Libyan city, spotted at cafes and other public places, even after the Obama administration publicly named him as a suspect.

He is accused of being a member of the Ansar al-Shariah group, the powerful Islamic militia that the U.S. believes was behind the attack.

He acknowledged in an interview with The Associated Press in January that he was present during the storming of the U.S. mission in Benghazi. But he denied involvement in the attack, saying he was trying to organize a rescue of trapped people.

In the attack, gunmen fired rocket-propelled grenades and stormed the mission, with many waving the black banners of Ansar al-Shariah.

The compound's main building was set ablaze. Ambassador Chris Stevens suffocated to death inside and another American was shot dead.

At the time, several witnesses said they saw Abu Khattala directing fighters at the site.

Later in the evening, gunmen attacked and shelled a safe house, killing two more Americans. No evidence has emerged that Abu Khattala was involved in the later attack.

Abu Khattala is one of just a few cases in which the administration has captured a suspected terrorist overseas and interrogated him for intelligence purposes before bringing him to federal court to face charges.

Those cases include Osama bin Laden's son-in-law, Sulaiman Abu Ghaith, who was arrested in Jordan in March 2013 and turned over to U.S. agents. A jury in New York City convicted him in March of conspiring to kill Americans.


AP National Security Writer Robert Burns contributed to this report.



U.S. attorney's office: http://tinyurl.com/pdakxfv

BELO HORIZONTE, Brazil (AP) — Brazil advanced to the World Cup quarterfinals on Saturday with a 3-2 shootout win over Chile following an intense and dramatic match that ended 1-1 after extra time.

Neymar, David Luiz and Marcelo scored in the shootout, and Brazil goalkeeper Julio Cesar saved two penalties before watching Gonzalo Jara's final attempt hit the post.

"My teammates are giving me a lot of strength on the field so I give my best," Julio Cesar said. "We're just three steps away and I hope to give another interview with Brazil partying."

Brazil will next face either Colombia or Uruguay in the quarterfinals.

Neither team managed to score at the Mineirao Stadium after first-half goals from Luiz and Sanchez, but Brazil came close to an early exit when Mauricio Pinilla's shot hit the crossbar in the final moments of extra time.

Chile also had the best chance in the second half, when Julio Cesar's spectacular save on Charles Aranguiz's shot kept the score even.

Brazil has reached the quarterfinals of each World Cup since Argentina eliminated it in the second round in 1990. Getting knocked out at that stage in its own World Cup would have been a disaster.

But the Brazilians overcame their nerves in the shootout, with Neymar scoring the final penalty after Julio Cesar stopped spot kicks from Pinilla and Sanchez.

When Jara hit the post, some of Brazil's players celebrated wildly while others fell to the ground, exhausted and emotionally drained. Willian, who missed a penalty for Brazil, sobbed uncontrollably, as Fred helped him to his feet.

As the crowd roared, the Brazilian players joined hands in a human chain. The Chileans stood still, wiping the sweat off their faces.

Brazil went ahead in the 18th minute after Thiago Silva deflected Neymar's corner kick toward the far post. Luiz was given the goal but replays showed Chile defender Gonzalo Jara may have touched the ball before it went in.

Brazil lost the lead when it failed to cope with Chile's aggressive pressure in a throw-in situation deep inside Brazil's half of the field. Eduardo Vargas intercepted Hulk's pass and found Sanchez on the right side of the area. The Barcelona striker scored easily with a shot toward the far post.

Neymar, Fred and Dani Alves had chances in the first half while a second-half goal from Hulk was disallowed when referee Howard Webb ruled he handled the ball.

NEW DELHI (AP) — Rescuers using gas cutters and shovels were searching in construction rubble Sunday for more than a dozen workers feared trapped in the second of two building collapses in India that together have killed at least 16 people.

The 12-story structure the workers were building collapsed late Saturday while heavy rains were pounding the outskirts of Chennai, the capital of southern Tamil Nadu state. Police said 26 construction workers had been pulled out so far and the search was continuing for more than a dozen others.

Two of the workers died on the spot and another three succumbed to injuries later in a hospital, said police officer George Fernandes.

Fifteen injured workers have been hospitalized, while six others were allowed to go home after medical attention on Saturday night, Fernandes said.

Nearly 300 policemen and fire service workers worked overnight, scouring the debris for survivors. They used gas cutters, iron rods and shovels to reach those trapped in the rubble.

Earlier Saturday, a four-story, 50-year-old structure toppled in an area of New Delhi inhabited by the poor. At least 11 people died and one survivor was being treated in a hospital, said fire service officer Praveer Haldiar.

Most homes in that part of the capital were built without permission and using substandard materials, police officer Madhur Verma said.

The Press Trust of India news agency said the New Delhi collapse was triggered by construction work on an adjacent plot.

Building collapses are common in India, where high demand for housing and lax regulations have encouraged some builders to cut corners, use substandard materials or add unauthorized extra floors.

In April last year, 74 people were killed when an eight-story building being constructed illegally in the Mumbai suburb of Thane in western Maharashtra state caved in. It was the worst building collapse in the country in decades.

LOS ANGELES (AP) — After several weather delays, NASA on Saturday launched a helium balloon carrying a saucer-shaped vehicle high in Earth's atmosphere to test technology that could be used to land on Mars.

Since the twin Viking spacecraft landed on the red planet in 1976, NASA has relied on the same parachute design to slow landers and rovers after piercing through the thin Martian atmosphere.

The $150 million experimental flight tests a novel vehicle and a giant parachute designed to deliver heavier spacecraft and eventually astronauts.

Viewers around the world with an Internet connection followed portions of the mission in real time thanks to telescopic cameras on the ground. Later in the mission, cameras on board the vehicle should turn on and beam back low-resolution footage.

After taking off at 11:40 a.m. from the Pacific Missile Range Facility on the Hawaiian island of Kauai, the balloon boosted the disc-shaped vehicle over the Pacific. Its rocket motor should then ignite, carrying the vehicle to 34 miles high at supersonic speeds.

The environment this high up is similar to the thin Martian atmosphere. As the vehicle prepares to drop back the Earth, a tube around it should expand like a Hawaiian puffer fish, creating atmospheric drag to dramatically slow it down from Mach 4, or four times the speed of sound.

Then the parachute should unfurl and guide the vehicle to an ocean splashdown. At 110 feet in diameter, the parachute is twice as big as the one that carried the 1-ton Curiosity rover through the Martian atmosphere in 2011.

The test was postponed six times because of high winds. Winds need to be calm so that the balloon doesn't stray into no-fly zones.

Engineers planned to analyze the data and conduct several more flights next year before deciding whether to fly the vehicle and parachute on a future Mars mission.

"We want to test them here where it's cheaper before we send it to Mars to make sure that it's going to work there," project manager Mark Adler of the NASA Jet Propulsion Laboratory said during a pre-launch news conference in Kauai in early June.

The technology envelope needs to be pushed or else humanity won't be able to fly beyond the International Space Station in low-Earth orbit, said Michael Gazarik, head of space technology at NASA headquarters.

Technology development "is the surest path to Mars," Gazarik said at the briefing.

ROGERS, Ark. (AP) — Michelle Wie shot her second straight 5-under 66 on Saturday to take a two-shot lead in the suspended second round of the NW Arkansas Championship.

Coming off a victory Sunday in the U.S. Women's Open at Pinehurst, Wie had six birdies and a bogey in her morning round at Pinnacle Country Club.

So Yeon Ryu, paired with Wie, was second after her second straight 67.

Seventy-two players were unable to finish the round because of afternoon thunderstorms.

Suzann Pettersen, Chella Choi and Line Vedel were three strokes back, and top-ranked and local favorite Stacy Lewis was four shots behind at 6 under.

Pettersen had a 67, Choi shot 65, and Vedel had five holes left.

Lewis birdied four of her first eight holes and finished with a 12-foot birdie putt on No. 9 for a 67. First-round leader Alena Sharp was 4 under overall after 15 holes.

SARAJEVO, Bosnia-Herzegovina (AP) — Artists and diplomats declared a new century of peace and unity in Europe on Saturday in the city where the first two shots of World War I were fired exactly 100 years ago.

On June 28, 1914, the Austro-Hungarian crown prince Franz Ferdinand was assassinated in Sarajevo, where he had come to inspect his occupying troops in the empire's eastern province.

The shots fired by Serb teenager Gavrilo Princip sparked the Great War, which was followed decades later by a second world conflict. Together the two wars cost some 80 million European their lives, ended four empires — including the Austro-Hungarian — and changed the world forever.

Visiting the assassination site Saturday, Sarajevan Davud Bajramovic, 67, said that in order to hold a second of silence for every person killed just during WWI in Europe, "we would have to stand silently for two years."

A century later, Sarajevans again crowded the same street along the river where Princip fired his shots. And the Austrians were also back, but this time with music instead of military: The Vienna Philharmonic Orchestra was scheduled to perform works of European composers reflecting the century's catastrophic events and conclude with a symbol of unity in Europe — the joint European hymn, Beethoven's "Ode of Joy."

The orchestra wanted to pay tribute to the history of Sarajevo, a place where religions meet, said the first violinist, Clemens Hellberg.

Austrian President Heinz Fischer said Europeans "have learnt that no problem can be solved by war."

The continent's violent century started in Sarajevo and ended in Sarajevo with the 1992-95 war that took 100,000 Bosnian lives.

"If anything good can be found in this repeating evil, it's more wisdom and readiness to build peace and achieve peace after a century of wars," said Bosnia's president, Bakir Izetbegovic.

The splurge of centennial concerts, speeches, lectures and exhibitions on Saturday were mostly focused on creating lasting peace and promoting unity in a country that is still struggling with similar divisions as it did 100 years ago. The rift was manifested by the Serbs marking the centennial by themselves in the part of Bosnia they control, where a performance re-enacted the assassination.

As Austrian conductor Franz Welser-Moest raised his baton in Sarajevo, an actor playing Gavrilo Princip descending from heaven on angel's wings, raised his pistol in the eastern town of Visegrad, at the border to Serbia, to kill Franz Ferdinand again in a spectacular performance designed for the occasion.

For the Serbs, Princip was a hero who saw Bosnia as part of the Serb national territory at a time when the country was part of the Austro-Hungarian Empire. His shots were a chance for them to include Bosnia into the neighboring Serbian kingdom — the same idea that inspired the Serbs in 1992 to fight the decision by Muslim Bosnians and Catholic Croats to declare the former republic of Bosnia independent when Serb-dominated Yugoslavia fell apart. Their desire is still to include the part of Bosnia they control into neighboring Serbia. Serbia itself flirts with both — the EU opposed unification with the Bosnian Serbs and its own EU membership candidacy.

Serbian crown prince Aleksandar Karadjordjevic, Serbian prime minister Aleksandar Vucic, President Tomislav Nikolic and the head of the Serbian Orthodox Church, Patriarch Irinej attended the ceremony in Visegrad where Serbian flags flew and the Serbian anthem was played although the town is in Bosnia.

Vucic said he was proud because in Visegrad "the Serbs are protecting their good reputation."

In Sarajevo, French philosopher and writer Bernard-Henry Levy said Europe owes Bosnia because it "stood idly by" as Serb nationalists bombed besieged multiethnic Sarajevo for 3.5 years. Levy started a petition Saturday among European intellectuals requesting the EU to "pay Bosnia back" by promptly giving it full membership in the European Union because it defended European values by itself 20 years ago.

"What Europe will gain from Bosnia is part of its spirit, part of its soul," he said, referring to efforts of some Bosnians to preserve the multiethnic character of the country and resist national division.

Serbian Prime Minister Aleksandar Vucic, a former hard-line nationalist-turned pro-EU reformer, previously said he considered going to Sarajevo for the centennial but gave up after realizing he would have to stand beside a plaque depicting Serbs as criminals.

Indeed, a plaque at the entrance of the recently reconstructed Sarajevo National Library building where the concert was taking place states "Serb criminals" had set the library ablaze in 1992 along with its two million books, magazines and manuscripts.

Karl von Habsburg, the grandson of the last Austrian emperor Charles I, was also attending the ceremonies.

"We need united Europe and one thing is for sure: Europe will never be complete without Bosnia," he stated.

ROGERS, Ark. (AP) — Whether it's because of her improved play or the reason for it, Michelle Wie appears as comfortable on and off the golf course as at any time in her career.

Wie continued her season-long surge on the LPGA Tour on Saturday, shooting her second straight 5-under 66 to take a two-shot lead in the suspended second round of the NW Arkansas Championship.

The performance put the U.S. Women's Open champion within a round of back-to-back wins for the first time in her LPGA Tour career, not that she showed any signs of stress after reaching 10 under overall.

In fact, shortly after surging into the lead at Pinnacle Country Club, Wie joined PGA Tour pros Rickie Fowler and Keegan Bradley as part of a social media challenge in dumping a bucket of ice water on herself on the driving range.

Yes, life is good at the moment for Wie.

"I think it comes hand in hand," Wie said about her winning and revamped attitude. "... I played really well toward the end of the year last year ... took a lot of time off, took about a month and a half. So, I just felt really refreshed, and I think it comes hand in hand."

All 72 players in the afternoon session were unable to finish on Saturday because of thunderstorms, with second-round play expected to finish early Sunday before the final round begins later in the morning.

Before the rain arrived, the morning pairings were once again left chasing Wie — who earned her first major victory at the U.S. Women's Open last week at Pinehurst after winning earlier in the season in her home state of Hawaii.

So Yeon Ryu, paired with Wie, was second at 8 under after her second straight 67, while Suzann Pettersen, Chella Choi and Line Vedel were three strokes back. Pettersen had a 67, Choi shot 65, and Vedel had five holes left.

Top-ranked and local favorite Stacy Lewis was four shots behind at 6 under, a week after finishing a shot behind Wie at Pinehurst. The two are training and practice partners in Florida, and Wie couldn't help but challenge her friend to the ice bucket shower after her dousing.

"Michelle's obviously playing some really good golf," Lewis said. "I'm going to have to shoot a good number tomorrow. ... At least I put a good number up today, and we'll see what happens tomorrow."

Lewis made the early charge Saturday to close within a shot of first-round leader Alena Sharp, much to the delight of the pro-Arkansas crowd — where Lewis played collegiately.

For the second straight day, however, Wie saved her best for the back.

She jumped into contention with a 4-under 31 on the back nine on Friday. After teeing off on the back nine Saturday, she once again closed with a flurry — birdieing four of her final seven holes to shoot a 4-under 32 and surge into the lead.

She putted 29 times on Saturday, a day after needing 28 in her opening round using her more hunched-over style.

"These days, Michelle's on fire," Ryu said. "I played with her today and yesterday, and her putting was awesome. I think that's why she could win a major tournament."

Wie put the finishing touch on her round — and quest for a second straight tournament victory — with a 3-foot birdie putt on No. 9 that put her within reach of back-to-back wins.

"I just want to kind of get through tomorrow," Wie said. "But at the same time, it is definitely in the back of my mind ... If I can get it done, hopefully it will happen."

Wie held off Lewis by a shot to win her first major title in the U.S Women's Open. Playing a group behind Lewis on Saturday, Wie bogeyed her second hole, No. 11, and recovered with a birdie on the par-5 14th.

She followed that with a second straight birdie on a par 5, getting up and down off the fringe on No. 18 to reach 6 under. Her birdie spree followed on the front nine, with large galleries following both Lewis and Wie.

Lewis followed a sluggish first round in which she putted 31 times by needing only 24 putts on Saturday. She stumbled with a bogey out of the greenside bunker on the par-3 fourth hole before recovering with birdies on No. 5 and 9.

She'll need more of the same if she or anyone else is to catch Wie on Sunday.

"It's going to have to be something pretty low," Lewis said. "The way Michelle and a lot of those girls play, they're not really going to come back to us."

BELO HORIZONTE, Brazil (AP) — Brazil and Chile were even at 1-1 at halftime in the second round of the World Cup following goals by David Luiz and Alexis Sanchez.

Brazil took the lead in the 18th minute after Thiago Silva deflected Neymar's corner kick toward the far post. Luiz was given the goal but Chile defender Gonzalo Jara may have touched the ball before it went in.

Chile equalized in the 32nd after Eduardo Vargas intercepted Hulk's pass and found Sanchez in the area. The Barcelona striker scored from the right side of the penalty area with a shot toward the far post.

Brazil has reached the quarterfinals at the last five World Cups. Chile has not advanced past the second round since it hosted the 1962 tournament.

ATLANTA (AP) — A Georgia man charged with murder after his 22-month-old son died in a hot SUV searched online for information about kids dying in cars and told police he feared it could happen, according to documents released Saturday as the boy's family held his funeral in Alabama.

The warrants released by the Cobb County Police Department provide more insight into the investigation of Cooper Harris' death on June 18.

Justin Ross Harris, 33, has told police he was supposed to drive his son to day care that morning but drove to work without realizing that his son was strapped into a car seat in the back.

In an interview after his son's death, Harris told investigators that he had done an online search on what temperature could cause a child's death in a vehicle. The warrant doesn't specify when Harris did the searches.

"During an interview with Justin, He stated that he recently researched, through the internet, child deaths inside vehicles and what temperature it needs to be for that to occur. Justin stated that he was fearful that this could happen," one of the four warrants released to The Associated Press stated.

Harris also told police he was on his way to meet friends after work when he realized his son was in the back seat and pulled into a shopping center to get help, according to the warrants.

Harris is charged with murder and second-degree child cruelty in his son's death, and remained in jail on Saturday as family members held a funeral in Tuscaloosa, Alabama. The Atlanta Journal-Constitution reported that Harris called the ceremony from the Cobb County Jail in Marietta, Georgia, and emotionally thanked people for their support since his arrest hours after the boy's death.

"(Cooper) never did anything to anyone," Harris said. "I'm just sorry I can't be there."

The boy's mother, Leanna Harris, also made her first comments about her son's death and the charges against her husband at the funeral ceremony.

""Ross was and is a wonderful father," Harris said to the applause of about 250 mourners according to the newspaper.

Police have said facts in the case "do not point toward simple negligence." A previously released arrest warrant stated that Harris stopped with his son for breakfast and returned to put something inside his car during the day while the child was still inside. The Cobb County Medical Examiner's office said Wednesday that it believes the cause of Cooper Harris' death was hyperthermia and manner of death was homicide.

The temperature that day was 88 degrees at 5:16 p.m., according to a warrant filed the day after the child died.

Police searched the Marietta, Georgia condo where the family lives, looking for a laptop, electronic devices documents, photographs and any "evidence of child neglect, child abuse." They also searched Harris' cellphone and the light blue 2011 Hyundai Tucson that Harris was driving when his son died.

In an obituary published this week, the child's family said Justin Ross Harris and his wife, Leanna, were "the most proud parents there could ever have been."

Cooper Harris loved trucks and cars, had just learned the color red and was a happy baby, it read.

"His 22 months of life were the most happy and fulfilling times of his mother's and father's lives, and we will miss him greatly," the obituary read.


Associated Press writer Kate Brumback contributed to this report.

BELO HORIZONTE, Brazil (AP) — Brazil defender David Luiz will play in Saturday's second round match against Chile at the World Cup despite a back injury that forced him out of the team's training session two days ago.

Luiz participated in part of the team's practice on Friday before undergoing an MRI scan to find out the extent of the injury. The Brazilian federation said nothing serious was detected, but he would remain undergoing treatment until just before the match.

Fernandinho is starting in Brazil's midfield instead of Paulinho. Fernandinho came on as a halftime substitute in Brazil's last group match against Cameroon, setting up a goal and scoring another in the 4-1 win in Fortaleza.

Central defender Gary Medel and midfielder Arturo Vidal will both start for Chile despite injury problems.

Vidal, who had knee surgery last month and hurt his right Achilles tendon in Brazil, was benched in Chile's previous match against Netherlands. Medel has been troubled by a muscle injury.



Brazil: Julia Cesar; Dani Alves, Thiago Silva, David Luiz, Marcelo; Luiz Gustavo, Fernandinho, Oscar; Hulk, Fred, Neymar.

Chile: Claudio Bravo; Mauricio Isla, Gary Medel, Eugenio Mena, Francisco Silva, Gonzalo Jara; Arturo Vidal, Marcelo Diaz, Charles Aranguiz; Alexis Sanchez, Eduardo Vargas.

America's Got Talent judges told the dancing hip-hop violinist Lindsey Stirling that her career had no hope, but she proved them wrong. She tells NPR's Scott Simon about her new album, Shatter Me.

SINGAPORE (AP) — Thousands of gay rights activists gathered in downtown Singapore on Saturday for an annual rally that came under unprecedented criticism from religious conservatives, with one influential Christian pastor calling on the government to ban the event.

Previous Pink Dot rallies have been held without much opposition. But as they grew in numbers from less than 3,000 people when the first event was held in 2009 to more than 20,000 last year, so did their disapproval. Organizers said a record 26,000 people showed up Saturday.

On paper, gay sex remains a criminal offence in the wealthy, multi-cultural city-state of 5.4 million, although authorities rarely enforce the British colonial-era legislation, known as Section 377A.

Lawrence Khong, the founder and pastor of the 10,000-member Faith Community Baptist Church, has been the most vocal critic of homosexuality and the Pink Dot rally.

In a statement, he said he could not understand why authorities were allowing the rally to take place.

"I find it even more disconcerting that the event is being used as a platform of public persuasion to push their alternative lifestyle," he said. "I would like to see our government leaders draw a clear line on where they now stand with regard to this moral issue."

Deputy Prime Minister Tharman Shanmugaratnam said he believed Singaporean society should be one "where you don't go pushing your own beliefs and preferences, but at the same time everyone else keeps the balance in society and avoids creating conflict."

Former lawmaker Siew Kum Hong, who tried to get Parliament to repeal Section 377A unsuccessfully, said he believed that the legislation will be overturned eventually.

"I've always maintained that the government's position is untenable. When presented with a chance to repeal 377A, it decided to avoid making a principled decision and instead opted to kick the can down the road."

Other opposition came from an Islamic teacher who encouraged Muslims to wear white Saturday on the eve of the holy Muslim month of Ramadan, which was interpreted as a response to a Pink Dot video showing a Singaporean Muslim declaring his support for the LGBT community.

The LGBT supporters wore pink in the rally, whose highlights include large crowds standing together with pink torchlights at night, creating a spectacular aerial view.

NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market drifted lower in light trading Friday, putting major indexes on track for their second weekly loss this month. Reports of sluggish economic growth have weighed on the market this week.

KEEPING SCORE: The Dow Jones industrial average fell 71 points, or 0.4 percent, to 16,775 as of 1:57 p.m. EST. The Standard & Poor's 500 index fell four points, or 0.2 percent, to 1,953, while the Nasdaq composite slipped one point, less than 0.1 percent, to 4,379.

LOOK BACK: After dropping three days this week, the S&P 500, the most widely used benchmark for stock funds, is on course for a weekly loss of 0.5 percent. Many investors have been waiting for the market to take a break from its long climb. The S&P 500 has gained 5.8 percent in three months and reached its latest all-time high on June 20, one week ago.

WHAT, NO WORRIES? "The fact is, it's the summer, and there isn't much happening," said Jack Ablin, chief investment officer at BMO Private Bank in Chicago.

Turmoil in the Middle East, however, could easily rattle U.S. markets, especially if the fighting in Iraq drives oil prices up too high, Ablin said. Rising tensions between Ukraine and Russia remain a concern.

"The risk in the summer typically isn't financial, it's political," he said. "This summer it's geopolitical: Iraq and Ukraine."

FORECAST CUT: DuPont dropped $3.22, or 5 percent, to $64.48, the biggest decline among the 30 big companies in the Dow. The company cut its profit forecast because of weaker sales of corn seeds.

THE BUSINESS OF SPORT: Nike gained $1.05, or 1 percent, to $77.91 after reporting earnings late Thursday that beat Wall Street's expectations. Stronger worldwide sales offset marketing costs for the World Cup soccer tournament. Nike provided the outfits for 10 national teams, including Team USA, for the World Cup in Brazil.

YOU AGAIN: Micheals Companies made a slight gain in its return to the stock market. Bain Capital and the Blackstone Group, two private equity firms, bought the operator of arts and crafts stores in 2006 and returned it to investors in a $472 million initial public offering. Much of the money raised in the IPO will be used to pay down debt. The company's stock rose 19 cents, or 1 percent, to $17.19.

HOW CONFIDENT: The Thomson Reuters/University of Michigan reading of consumer confidence edged up to 82.5 in June, a slight increase over the previous month and better than economists had predicted.

WORLD MARKETS: Asian indexes closed lower. In Europe, France's CAC 40 slipped 0.1 percent while Germany's DAX edged up 0.1 percent. The FTSE 100 index of leading British companies rose 0.3 percent.

BONDS AND COMMODITIES: Bond prices rose, pushing Treasury yields lower. The yield on the 10-year note slipped to 2.52 percent from 2.53 percent on Thursday. The price of oil fell 10 cents to $105.73 a barrel.

PORTLAND, Ore. (AP) — When Rachel Martinez-Regan graduated from Corvallis High School this month, her diploma had a little something extra — an embossed seal certifying that she is bilingual.

She is one of more than a dozen students at the Oregon high school who earned the distinction based on their proficiency in English and Spanish. The honor is part of a pilot project led by several school districts in the state with dual-language programs, and the Oregon Department of Education plans to make the bilingual seals available statewide next year.

California, New Mexico, Washington, Illinois and Louisiana are among the other states that are recognizing and rewarding bilingual education.

Martinez-Regan said the bilingual program was academically challenging but she's certain it will give her career plans a boost.

"I'm thinking of becoming a lawyer, to give the Spanish-speaking community a voice," said Martinez-Regan, who is half Latina but did not speak Spanish before enrolling in the program. She will attend Yale University this fall.

Dual-language programs have gained in popularity across the country as employers seek bilingual, bicultural workers, and more parents view bilingualism as necessary for their children's success in a globalized world.

Such programs are offered in Spanish, Mandarin, Vietnamese and Russian, among other languages, and many have waiting lists. Enrolled students take literacy and academic subjects in a foreign language for at least part of the school day.

Experts say dual programs and the languages they teach also reflect the nation's growing diversity and the fact that students who speak a language other than English at home are among America's fastest-growing populations.

Congress first mandated bilingual education in 1968 to keep non-English-speaking students from falling behind their peers, by teaching them academic subjects in their native language while they also learned English. Bilingual programs were put in place throughout the United States and flourished for several decades.

But as the number of immigrants, especially Asians and Latinos, exploded in the 1980s and 1990s and continued to grow, there was a backlash to ensure English did not lose its primacy. More than 20 states made English their official language.

Critics, including some immigrant parents, said bilingual education was costly and ineffective for English-language learners. Several states, including California and Arizona, banned bilingual education outright.

In recent years, though, bilingual education has regained its popularity and is increasingly attracting native English speakers. The number of dual-language programs, which bring together native English students and English learners in one classroom, ballooned from about 260 nationwide in 2000 to about 3,000 today, according to the Maryland-based National Association for Bilingual Education.

"American parents are coming to the conclusion that the lives and the economic opportunities of their children are tied to being bilingual," said the group's executive director, Santiago Wood.

At Corvallis High School, bilingual seals were awarded on the basis of coursework, bicultural knowledge, and a bilingual exit interview and assessment, said Amanda Filloy Sharp, who teaches Spanish-language courses in literature, history and geography at the school.

"These students are not just able to speak academically in both Spanish and English, they also have a deeper understanding of and connection to the local Spanish-speaking community," Filloy Sharp said.

California, the first state to adopt a biliteracy seal two years ago, has granted more than 30,000 diplomas with seals to students. State records show the seals recognize more than 40 different languages. The California Legislature, meanwhile, is considering a bill that would overturn the bilingual education ban.

Critics such as Silicon Valley entrepreneur Ron Unz, whose organization English for the Children helped dismantle bilingual education in California and elsewhere, say the push for bilingual classrooms remains misguided.

In dual-language programs, Unz said, immigrant children may be "used as unpaid tutors" and "English-speaking children who come from affluent families will benefit much more than English learners."

But in Oregon, a group of educators, university and state officials says the programs help close the achievement gap for English learners. Several districts with dual-language programs that extend from elementary to high school are working with area universities to help evaluate the students.

Graduates with the seals could get college credit or advanced placement in college courses, said David Bautista, assistant superintendent in the Oregon Department of Education Equity Unit.

"A world class education needs to teach fluency in more than one language. In other countries that's already embedded," Bautista said, adding that there are about 70 dual-language programs in Oregon and the state's goal is to expand their numbers.

Corvallis High School graduates who earned the seal this year have the same level of language proficiency as Spanish majors who have earned a bachelor's degree in a university Spanish program, said Ron Mize, a professor in the School of Language, Culture, and Society at Oregon State University.

Most of the students started learning Spanish in elementary school. "The seal is something students can do to stand out from their peers," Mize said. "That's the kind of commitment colleges are looking for."



National Association for Bilingual Education: http://www.nabe.org

WASHINGTON (AP) — The Supreme Court is poised to deliver its verdict in a case that weighs the religious rights of employers and the right of women to the birth control of their choice.

The court meets for a final time Monday to release decisions in its two remaining cases before the justices take off for the summer.

The cases involve birth control coverage under President Barack Obama's health law and fees paid to labor unions representing government employees by workers who object to being affiliated with a union.

Two years after Chief Justice John Roberts cast the pivotal vote that saved the health care law in the midst of Obama's campaign for re-election, the justices are considering a sliver of the law.

Employers must cover contraception for women at no extra charge among a range of preventive benefits in employee health plans.

Dozens of companies, including the Oklahoma City-based arts and crafts chain Hobby Lobby, claim religious objections to covering some or all contraceptives.

The methods and devices at issue before the Supreme Court are those that Hobby Lobby and furniture maker Conestoga Wood Specialties Corp. of East Earl, Pennsylvania, say can work after conception. They are the emergency contraceptives Plan B and ella, as well as intrauterine devices, which can cost up to $1,000.

The Obama administration says insurance coverage for birth control is important to women's health and reduces the number of unwanted pregnancies, as well as abortions.

The court has never recognized a for-profit corporation's religious rights under federal law or the Constitution. But even some supporters of the administration's position said they would not be surprised if the court were to do so on Monday, perhaps limiting the right to corporations that are under tight family control.

Several justices worried at the argument in March that such a decision would lead to religious objections to covering blood transfusions or vaccinations.

Prominent Washington lawyer Paul Smith said another important question is how the decision would apply to "laws that protect people from discrimination, particularly LGBT people."

In the Hobby Lobby case, even if the court finds such a right exists, it still has to weigh whether the government's decision to have employee health plans pay for birth control is important enough to overcome the companies' religious objections.

It is no surprise that this high-profile case, argued three months ago, is among the last released.

The other unresolved case has been hanging around since late January, often a sign that the outcome is especially contentious.

Home health care workers in Illinois want the court to rule that public sector unions cannot collect fees from workers who aren't union members. The idea behind compulsory fees for nonmembers is that the union negotiates the contract for all workers, so they all should share in the cost of that work.

The court has been hostile to labor unions in recent years. If that trend continues Monday, the justices could confine their ruling to home health workers or they could strike a big blow against unions more generally.

The U.S. men's soccer team is advancing to the round of 16 in the World Cup. NPR's Scott Simon talks to Howard Bryant of ESPN.com about the team's chance of getting through the knockout round.

BUENOS AIRES, Argentina (AP) — An Argentine judge has charged Vice President Amado Boudou with bribery and conducting business incompatible with public office in the acquisition of the company that prints the country's currency and of later benefiting from government contracts.

Boudou is accused of using shell companies and secret middlemen to gain control of the company that was given contracts to print the Argentine peso and campaign material for the ticket he shared with President Cristina Fernandez.

Federal judge Ariel Lijo's decision was published Friday night on the justice department's website. The judge also ordered 200,000 pesos ($25,000) seized from Boudou, who will remain free while he waits trial in the case along with five other defendants.

Boudou is the first sitting Argentine vice president to face such charges. He could be sentenced to between one and six years in prison, and a lifetime ban from elective office.

Boudou, who was on an official trip to Central America, says he's innocent of the accusations despite evidence linking him to other defendants that was made public through investigative reports by Argentina's newspapers.

Many Argentines have questioned why Fernandez has remained loyal to her No. 2 when allegations have made him Argentina's least popular politician, opponents are threatening to impeach him and some allies say he should resign. His falling fortunes have left the government without a clear presidential successor ahead of the 2015 elections. Fernandez has yet to speak publicly about the case.

According to the judge's investigation, Boudou — as economy minister and then vice president — acted to smooth the Ciccone Calcografica printing company's exit from bankruptcy and engineer its purchase by a shell company so he and other secret partners could benefit from unusual tax exemptions and lucrative government contracts.

The shell company, The Old Fund, was led by businessman Alejandro Vandenbroele, who is accused of secretly representing Boudou in business deals. The scandal broke open after Vandenbroele's former wife exposed the alleged arrangement, saying she had to give media interviews because her life was being threatened for what she knew.

Others who were charged Friday include longtime Boudou friend and business partner Jose Maria Nunez Carmona; Vandenbroele; former tax agency official Rafael Resnick Brenner; printing company co-founder Nicolas Ciccone, and his son-in-law Guillermo Reinwick.

The Ciccones have said Boudou was personally involved in the negotiations that persuaded them to sell 70 percent of the family company to The Old Fund.

Boudou has not denied signing a decree as economy minister that effectively erased the printer's debts by enabling the new owners to pay back taxes over many years at below-market interest rates.

RIO DE JANEIRO (AP) — They flock to games with faces painted and draped in flags. They hold up signs and wear funny hats. They chant and sing until they're hoarse. They're the traveling fans, and they're helping give the World Cup the feel of Carnival.

For many of the 16 teams left in soccer's biggest extravaganza, the dedicated traveling fans offer the kind of boost that makes them feel like they've got an extra player.

Colombia coach Jose Pekerman credits the tens of thousands of supporters who turned the stadium at Belo Horizonte into a sea of yellow for his team's first match, against Greece, for helping the team win its first World Cup game in 16 years.

"I was very touched by what I saw in the stands," he says, adding that the overwhelming support turned the stadium into a fortress for Colombia.

The Colombians carried that confidence through the rest of the group stage, winning all three games and advancing into the second round.

Hundreds of thousands of fans from all over the Americas have flooded into Brazil for the tournament, where teams from the region account for half of the remaining competitors. But the Dutch in their orange and the Swiss in their red are still wildly waving the flags for Europe.

NEW YORK (AP) — An American rower who set out to cross the Atlantic Ocean in honor of his brother reached the Caribbean island of Saint Martin.

A spokeswoman for 48-year-old Victor Mooney said early Saturday the specially built oceangoing rowboat was towed about 20 miles to shore Friday while Mooney was aboard a search and rescue vessel. He has lost 80 pounds as he continues a 3,000-mile journey from the African coast to the British Virgin Islands, and then another 1,800-plus miles to New York.

Mooney was taken to a hospital for observation when he arrived, spokeswoman Lisa Samuels said in an email. She said that Mooney survived a shark attack that punctured his boat and will continue to the British Virgin Islands after getting "some needed rest."

Mooney set off Feb. 19 in a 24-foot boat from Maspolamas, Gran Canaria. His journey is being done in honor of a brother who died of AIDS in 1983. Mooney is hoping to encourage voluntary HIV testing.

Mooney has tried the same feat three other times, without success.

Mooney's first trans-Atlantic attempt, in 2006, ended when a 24-foot, wooden rowboat he'd built himself sank off the West African coast just hours after he'd pushed off from a beach in Senegal.

Three years later, he tried again with an oceangoing rowboat boat built by a professional. Its drinking water systems failed after two weeks at sea and he had to be rescued.

In 2011, Mooney set off from the Cape Verde Islands in an even more sophisticated boat. But that vessel, dubbed the Never Give Up, had apparently been damaged in transit and sprang a leak shortly after he put to sea.

He escaped in a life raft then spent two weeks drifting 250 miles on the open ocean.



Goree Challenge: http://www.goreechallenge.com

Pope Francis was a young priest in Argentina during its Dirty War. Journalist Alma Guillermoprieto talks with NPR's Scott Simon about her article, "Francis's Holy War," and his controversial history.

NEW YORK (AP) — Youth soccer has been popular in the U.S. for more than a generation, and that may be driving high viewer ratings for World Cup games involving the U.S. Here's a look at five people who grew up playing and loving soccer in America, from a woman who played on a boys' team as a kid and now coaches boys' soccer, to a man who named his dogs after World Cup players.



The 42-year-old Chicago attorney has two soccer-playing sons, 8 and 10, and coaches youth leagues. His own parents signed him up when he was 5.

"They're not very sports-minded people. It's just what you did. Every kid I knew played soccer and baseball," he said. "For me and a lot in my generation, we stumbled into it and fell in love by accident."

While he doesn't own a jersey or paint his face, Helfand has seen the U.S. team play in person 16 times, traveling as far away as Australia and Ireland.

He's amazed how far the sport has come in the United States. "Walking down the street now, you see kids wearing Manchester United jerseys and Chelsea Football Club jerseys and Barcelona, and I didn't even know what those were as a kid. I didn't know who the best players were in Europe," Helfand said.

He loved the go-go nature of the game compared to other sports.

"I was a hyper child and the idea of playing in the infield much less the outfield in baseball, and just standing there waiting for something to happen or waiting for your turn to bat, never really appealed to me," he said.



Cureton, 30, of Bealeton, Virginia, started playing when she was 4, introduced to the game by her older brother. Now, she's a rare female coach of a varsity boys' soccer team, at Patriot High School in Nokesville, Virginia.

"I was in gymnastics when my brother was in soccer and his team used to let me play with them. I hated wearing leotards," she said.

Growing up in rural Pennsylvania, Cureton often played on boys' teams. There was no all-girls soccer team, but the two or three girls who made the boys' teams faced resistance.

"Boys were very threatened by it. It would be a lot of teasing. It was, 'You must be a boy.' It never affected me. I just wanted to play soccer," she said.

Cureton went to George Mason University on a soccer scholarship but stopped playing competitively after college, partly due to injuries.

"I had nine concussions between 14 and 21. If there were concussion baseline tests now I would have never played in college," she said.



Garcia, 52, was 16 when he moved to New York City from Bogota, Colombia.

"Oh my god, playing soccer is all we did. We'd play soccer waiting for the bus. We'd play soccer in the classrooms, in the hallways. We'd come home and play in the rain," he said.

But in the U.S., the soccer-crazed teen from Colombia could barely find a game.

"In the Bronx there was a park near where we lived where some Europeans played. Me and my brother used to play there a lot. Everybody was playing football and basketball and baseball," Garcia said. "I lost a little bit of the drive to play when we came here."

After high school, he joined the U.S. Army and played some, then became an aviation mechanic for United Airlines, which hosted employee soccer tournaments.

Garcia, now an engineer for a San Francisco water treatment plant, spent 18 years coaching boys' soccer, including at his now 20-year-old son's high school.

"When I started coaching here in the United States, I didn't understand why the parents didn't want to let the kids play every day," he said. "We never got tired. We never burned out."

The game is "a natural high," said Garcia, who still plays but has bad knees from the sport. "Soccer is like life. It's running through my blood. I want to play it. Getting old really stinks."



Ben Fox, 28, sells solar panels in San Francisco but grew up in the small Vermont town of Peru. He started soccer when he was 4 and played until knee injuries took him out in college.

"We skied in the winter and pretty much everyone played soccer in the summer," he said. "But soccer was all I wanted to do all the time."

His dad is English but wasn't a rabid soccer fan, thinking his son should study more and play soccer less.

Fox's family used to breed English springer spaniel dogs.

"The first litter, I named all the dogs after members of the 1994 World Cup teams, like Dunga, who was the captain of Brazil at the time," he said.

His mom, an American and the parent who schlepped him to games, named her favorite dog Mia Hamm.



The 46-year-old co-owner of a public relations firm in Dallas played soccer from age 7 through college. His three kids gave him a USA team jersey for Father's Day.

"My dad had no idea about soccer. I had a friend at school who started playing and I came home one day and said I wanted to sign up," he recalled.

The Dallas Tornado and other North American Soccer League teams were promoting the sport when Coulter was growing up. Many players had come from England, Brazil and other soccer-centric countries for one last chance to play.

"I just idolized those old guys. They're the ones who really lit the fire and just made us love the sport. Guys like Kenny Cooper and Mike Renshaw and Pele," he said. "When I was a kid, you had two different groups of friends. You had the ones who played soccer and then everybody else."

Coulter coached boys' teams before he became a dad, was a ref in college and has coached his kids. His oldest played from age 4 but gave it up when she started high school.

"My jaw sort of dropped," he admits.


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NEW YORK (AP) — Shia LaBeouf was released from police custody Friday after he was escorted from a Broadway theater for yelling obscenities and continued to act irrationally while being arrested, authorities said.

After his court appearance, the actor, wearing a ripped blue T-shirt, skinny jeans and boots, walked several blocks to The London NYC Hotel on West 54th Street. He declined to comment.

The 28-year-old, who starred in the first three "Transformers" movies, was arrested on charges of disorderly conduct, criminal trespass and harassment Thursday night at the show "Cabaret."

The inside of the Broadway theater, which used to be a notorious, coke-fueled disco in the 1970s, has been reworked to look like a decadent Berlin cabaret from the 1930s, with tiny nightclub tables, an offstage working bar and waitresses who offer shots, small dishes and cocktails. LaBeouf was in the audience and had paid for his ticket himself. During the show, he was seen offering a strawberry to a woman and lighting a cigarette.

According to police, security guards asked LaBeouf to leave the Studio 54 theater at about 8:45 p.m., but he refused, used obscene language and physically interfered with employees. Police said he made aggressive statements and threats to security guards and police officers.

He was acting irrationally, continued to make aggressive statements and used foul language after he was removed from the theater and throughout the arrest process, police said. Officers said he appeared intoxicated or under the influence of some kind of drug.

A spokesman for "Cabaret" says LaBeouf was "disruptive during Act 1" and was escorted out of the theater at intermission.

LaBeouf, who was represented by a Legal Aid attorney Friday, was due back in court July 24.

On Friday, as the pack of reporters trailed him to the hotel, a reporter fell out of her shoe. LaBeouf stopped to help her get back into it.

LaBeouf's other films include "Indiana Jones and the Kingdom of the Crystal Skull," "Disturbia" and "Wall Street: Money Never Sleeps."

Last year, he pulled out of what would have been his Broadway debut in "Orphans," a play starring Alec Baldwin. LaBeouf left the production over what was described as "creative differences" and was replaced by Ben Foster.

LaBeouf has been arrested previously.

In 2008, he was taken into custody on suspicion of drunken driving after another driver crashed into his vehicle in West Hollywood, California, but prosecutors later concluded there was insufficient evidence to file a formal charge.

In 2007, he was arrested for refusing to leave a downtown Chicago drugstore. Prosecutors dropped the case after store officials said they didn't want to continue it.

In February, the actor participated in a performance-art oddity at a Los Angeles art gallery wearing a bag over his head with the words "I AM NOT FAMOUS ANYMORE" scrawled in black ink across it.

The stunt came days after he posed on the red carpet at the Berlin Film Festival in the same getup. At the same festival, he walked out of a news conference after answering a reporter's question by saying: "When the seagulls follow the trawler, it is because they think sardines will be thrown into the sea. Thank you very much." The line was borrowed from a French soccer player who baffled reporters with it in the mid-1990s.

Last year, LaBeouf came under fire for borrowing the storyline and dialogue for his short film "Howard Cantour.com," which closely resembled the 2007 graphic novel "The Death-Ray" by Daniel Clowes. LaBeouf apologized on Twitter in a series of posts that were directly lifted from other famous mea culpas.

NEW YORK (AP) — The stock market drifted mostly lower in light trading Friday, putting major indexes on track for their second weekly loss this month. Reports of sluggish economic growth have weighed on the market this week.

KEEPING SCORE: The Dow Jones industrial average fell 48 points, or 0.3 percent, to 16,798 as of 3:02 p.m. EST. The Standard & Poor's 500 index fell two points, or 0.1 percent, to 1,954, while the Nasdaq composite slipped edged up seven points, or 0.2 percent, to 4,386.

LOOK BACK: After dropping three days this week, the S&P 500, the most widely used benchmark for stock funds, is on course for a weekly loss of 0.5 percent. Many investors have been waiting for the market to take a break from its long climb. The S&P 500 has gained 5.8 percent in three months and reached its latest all-time high on June 20, one week ago.

WHAT, NO WORRIES? "The fact is, it's the summer, and there isn't much happening," said Jack Ablin, chief investment officer at BMO Private Bank in Chicago.

Turmoil in the Middle East, however, could easily rattle U.S. markets, especially if the fighting in Iraq drives oil prices up too high, Ablin said. Rising tensions between Ukraine and Russia remain a concern.

"The risk in the summer typically isn't financial, it's political," he said. "This summer it's geopolitical: Iraq and Ukraine."

FORECAST CUT: DuPont dropped $2.70, or 4 percent, to $65, the biggest decline among the 30 big companies in the Dow. The company cut its profit forecast because of weaker sales of corn seeds.

THE BUSINESS OF SPORT: Nike gained $1.05, or 1 percent, to $77.91 after reporting earnings late Thursday that beat Wall Street's expectations. Stronger worldwide sales offset marketing costs for the World Cup soccer tournament. Nike provided the outfits for 10 national teams, including Team USA, for the World Cup in Brazil.

YOU AGAIN: Micheals Companies made a slight gain in its return to the stock market. Bain Capital and the Blackstone Group, two private equity firms, bought the operator of arts and crafts stores in 2006 and returned it to investors in a $472 million initial public offering. Much of the money raised in the IPO will be used to pay down debt. The company's stock rose 19 cents, or 1 percent, to $17.19.

HOW CONFIDENT: The Thomson Reuters/University of Michigan reading of consumer confidence edged up to 82.5 in June, a slight increase over the previous month and better than economists had predicted.

WORLD MARKETS: Asian indexes closed lower. In Europe, France's CAC 40 slipped 0.1 percent while Germany's DAX edged up 0.1 percent. The FTSE 100 index of leading British companies rose 0.3 percent.

BONDS AND COMMODITIES: Bond prices were little changed. The yield on the 10-year Treasury note held steady at 2.53 percent. The price of oil fell 10 cents to $105.74 a barrel.

ELKHORN, Wis. (AP) — Bond was set at $1 million on Friday for a former police officer suspected in the deaths of two women whose bodies were stuffed into suitcases and dumped along a rural Wisconsin highway.

Steven Zelich, a 52-year-old security officer, is charged with two counts of hiding a corpse. Walworth County prosecutors convinced a judge to set the high bond after saying they expected homicide charges to be filed in the counties where the women were killed.

But Zelich's attorney suggested the women may have died during accidents, perhaps during consensual sex. Investigators have said he met the two women online.

Zelich appeared for the hearing Friday through a video from jail but did not speak.

Zelich was arrested Wednesday, when detectives wearing hazmat suits removed a refrigerator and large brown bags of evidence from his apartment in West Allis, a Milwaukee suburb.

Highway workers cutting grass discovered two suitcases on June 5. Police identified one woman as Laura Simonson, 37, of Farmington, Minnesota. Authorities have not released the identity of the second woman but describe her as a white female with long, dark hair, a pronounced overbite and a small heart tattoo on her lower left abdomen.

Investigators allege that Zelich said he met both women online, killed them and stored their bodies in his home and vehicle for months before dropping the suitcases in the Town of Geneva, some 50 miles southwest of Milwaukee. He killed the unidentified woman in Kenosha County, Wisconsin, in late 2012 or early 2013 and Simonson in Rochester, Minnesota, in November, according to a criminal complaint.

Judge David Reddy accepted the prosecutor's request for a $1 million cash bond, noting that the most important thing was to protect the public.

Walworth County District Attorney Daniel Necci justified the request in part by saying he expected homicide charges to be filed in Kenosha County and Olmsted County, Minnesota, which includes Rochester.

Walworth County public defender Travis Schwantes unsuccessfully argued that the bond should reflect the charges filed, not those that may come.

Farmington police detective Sgt. Lee Hollatz said previously that Zelich was long his main suspect in Simonson's disappearance because soon after her family reported her missing, he learned she had checked into a Rochester, Minnesota, hotel with Zelich on Nov. 2. Zelich left alone the next day.

But Hollatz said he all he had was a missing person's case until the bodies were discovered.

Jim Martinson, chief deputy attorney in Olmsted County, said Friday that he needed to see the evidence before deciding what charges to file and the "lion's share" of that was in Wisconsin. He said he hadn't received reports yet from the many law enforcement agencies involved in the investigation.

Martinson also said it could be a while before forensic evidence from the hotel was processed and Zelich was extradited to Minnesota.

Simonson was found naked except for a collar, with a rope around her neck and a gag in her mouth, according to the criminal complaint filed in Walworth County. The other woman's hands were bound behind her back.

Police have said that at least in Simonson's case, Zelich may have met her through a bondage website.

Zelich worked for the West Allis police department from February 1989 until his resignation in August 2001. From 2007 until his arrest, he worked as a licensed private security officer with Securitas Security Services USA. The company said he passed regular background checks to keep his state-issued license.


Associated Press writer Steve Karnowski in Minneapolis contributed to this report.

SAN FRANCISCO (AP) — San Francisco's iconic Golden Gate Bridge moved a big step closer to getting an oft-debated suicide barrier after bridge officials on Friday approved a $76 million funding package for a net system that would prevent people from jumping to their deaths.

The bridge district's board of directors voted unanimously in favor of the funding for a steel suicide net, which includes $20 million in bridge toll revenue. Federal money will provide the bulk of the remaining funding, though the state is also pledging $7 million.

A tearful Dan Barks, of Napa, who lost his son, Donovan, to suicide on the bridge in 2008, said after the vote that he was almost speechless.

"A lot of people have done so much incredible work to get this accomplished," he said.

After the vote, he rose from his knees and shared a tearful embrace with Sue Story of Rocklin, whose son Jacob jumped off the bridge in 2010.

"We did it, Dan! We did it! It's no longer the Bridge of Death anymore," she said.

At least some of the money still requires additional approval. The bridge's board, however, has now taken its final step in adopting the net.

"The tragedy of today is that we can't go back in time, we can't save ... the people who jumped off the bridge. But the good thing, with this vote today, we can vote in their memory," board member Janet Reilly said. "We will save many lives who have followed in their footsteps and that's what so extraordinary about today."

The Golden Gate Bridge, with its sweeping views of the Pacific Ocean and San Francisco Bay, has long been a destination for people seeking to end their lives. Since it opened in 1937, more than 1,400 people have plunged to their deaths, including a record 46 suicides last year, officials said.

Officials have been discussing a suicide barrier on the bridge for decades. The bridge's board voted in 2008 to install a stainless steel net, rejecting other options, including raising the 4-foot-high railings and leaving the iconic span unchanged.

Two years later, they certified the final environmental impact report for the net, which would stretch about 20 feet wide on each side of the span. Officials say it will not mar the landmark bridge's appearance.

But funding for the project remained a major obstacle.

A significant hurdle was overcome two years ago when President Barack Obama signed into law a bill making safety barriers and nets eligible for federal funds.

House Minority Leader Nancy Pelosi of California in a statement Friday praised the bridge's board and Assemblyman Tom Ammiano, D-San Francisco, who has been a staunch supporter of a barrier.

"The Golden Gate Bridge is a source of immense pride to San Francisco, but for too many families in our community, it has also been a place of pain," Peloisi said. "A suicide prevention barrier offers a critical second chance for troubled men and women acting on often impulsive suicidal thoughts. Together, we can ensure this magnificent landmark stands as a faithful companion for all San Franciscans, awing and inspiring visitors for generations to come."

Most jumpers suffer a grisly death, with massive internal injuries, broken bones and skull fractures. Some die from internal bleeding. Others drown.

Kevin Hines, who miraculously survived his suicide attempt after jumping off the structure in 2000 at age 19, urged the board before its vote to "not let one more family sit in eternal pain, in perpetuity because of politics."

He later broke down after the unanimous vote approving the funding.

"I feel like a giant weight has been lifted off my shoulders, all of our shoulders. I feel free," Hines said. "I feel a sense of hope that I haven't had in a very long time. It's not over yet, we will be here until that net is raised and no more people die."

Richard Gamboa of Sacramento, whose son, Kyle was among the 46 bridge suicides last year, said while Friday's vote is momentous, he's not done fighting.

"It's not over for me. I'm going to keep coming here and urging them to get the barrier done. When I go on that bridge and look down and see that net there, then I will be at peace," Gamboa said.

John Brooks, whose 17-year-old daughter, Casey, jumped from the rust-colored span in 2008, told the board Friday that he hopes that some measure is taken before the net is constructed to provide some kind of safety to everybody.

"What I really don't want to see between now and the time it is done is more deaths," Brooks said. "That will be a cruel irony."

Board members and San Francisco supervisors David Campos and London Breed both agreed that the sooner the barrier is built, the better.

"We need to build it as quickly as we can," Campos said.

Bidding on the job is expected to start next year, with completion of construction expected in 2018.

BRUSSELS (AP) — Over Russia's objections, Ukraine's new president on Friday signed a free-trade deal binding his country more closely to Western Europe, sealing the very agreement that triggered the bloodshed and political convulsions of the past seven months.

Russia, meanwhile, fended off for the time being a new, more crippling round of Western sanctions over its intervention in Ukraine, where a fragile cease-fire between government forces and pro-Moscow separatists in the east was set to expire Friday night.

"What a great day!" a beaming Ukrainian President Petro Poroshenko said in Brussels upon the signing of the economic agreement with the European Union. "Maybe the most important day for my country after independence."

Since it became independent in the 1991 Soviet collapse, Ukraine has been involved in a delicate balancing act between Russia and the West. The Kremlin wants to keep Ukraine, the birthplace of Russian statehood and Russian Orthodox Christianity, in its orbit.

In November, under pressure from Moscow, Ukrainian President Viktor Yanuknovych spiked the EU pact, triggering huge protests that drove him from power. Moscow responded by annexing the mainly Russian-speaking Crimean Peninsula in March, and pro-Russian separatists soon rose up in Ukraine's eastern provinces.

While Friday's signing marked a defeat for Russian President Vladimir Putin, who has threatened to cancel trade preferences for Ukraine, the Kremlin made no immediate move to punish its neighbor.

Putin spokesman Dmitry Peskov said Russia will take the necessary measures to protect its markets only when the agreement takes effect. That will take a few months.

Meanwhile, EU leaders decided not to immediately impose new sanctions on Russia for the uprising. But they warned that punitive measures have been drawn up and could be levied immediately.

And they demanded Russia and the rebels take steps to ease the violence, including releasing all captives, retreating from border checkpoints and launching "substantial negotiations" on Poroshenko's peace plan.

The weeklong cease-fire, which both sides have been accused of violating, was set to expire at 10 p.m. local time. Poroshenko said he would decide whether to extend it. Insurgent leader Alexander Borodai said the rebels were ready to do so and would also soon release the European observers they have been holding for weeks.

At the signing ceremony, Poroshenko reminded EU leaders of the bloodshed in his country.

Ukraine "paid the highest possible price to make her European dreams come true," he said, asking the EU to pledge that one day Ukraine can join the 28-nation bloc. Membership "would cost the European Union nothing," he said, "but would mean the world to my country."

In Kiev's Independence Square, the site of last winter's huge protests against Russian domination, balloons the color of the EU's blue flag were released over the crowd as a rock band pounded out the European Union's anthem, Beethoven's "Ode to Joy."

The crowd of several hundred was far smaller than the hundreds of thousands who jammed the square at the height of the protests. Rain, people getting out of town ahead of a long holiday weekend, and the simmering conflict in the east worked to restrain the mood.

Protest veteran Oleg Mityukhin, 48, came wrapped in the Ukrainian flag.

"I think there will be less corruption, there will be better quality goods, and it will be a push forward for the development of Ukraine," he said.

The agreements signed Friday let businesses in Ukraine and two other former Soviet republics, Moldova and Georgia, trade freely in any of the EU's nations without tariffs or restrictions as long as their goods and practices meet EU standards. Likewise, goods and services from the EU will be sold more easily and cheaply in the three countries.

Amanda Paul, a policy analyst at the Brussels-based think tank European Policy Center, said Russia has levers to inflict serious economic pain on Ukraine, Moldova and Georgia through trade restrictions, cuts in energy supplies or the deportation of migrant workers from those countries.

European Commission experts estimate the deal will boost Ukraine's national income by 1.2 billion euros ($1.6 billion) a year.

The deal also demands that Ukraine adopt EU rules on government contracts, competition and copyrights — steps that could reduce corruption and make the country more attractive to investors.


Isachenkov reported from Moscow. AP correspondents David McHugh in Kiev, Geir Moulson in Berlin, Juergen Baetz in Brussels, Laura Mills in Moscow and Balint Szlanko in Donetsk, Ukraine, contributed to this report.

WARSAW, Poland (AP) — President Barack Obama's administration has taken the U.S. gay rights revolution global, using American embassies across the world as outposts in a struggle that still hasn't been won at home.

Sometimes U.S. advice and encouragement is condemned as unacceptable meddling. And sometimes it can seem to backfire, increasing the pressure on those it is meant to help.

With gay pride parades taking place in many cities across the world this weekend, the U.S. role will be more visible than ever. Diplomats will take part in parades and some embassies will fly the rainbow flag along with the Stars and Stripes.

The United States sent five openly gay ambassadors abroad last year, with a sixth nominee, to Vietnam, now awaiting Senate confirmation. American diplomats are working to support gay rights in countries such as Poland, where prejudice remains deep, and to oppose violence and other abuse in countries like Nigeria and Russia, where gays face life-threatening risks.

"It is incredible. I am amazed by what the U.S. is doing to help us," said Mariusz Kurc, the editor of a Polish gay advocacy magazine, Replika, which has received some U.S. funding and other help. "We are used to struggling and not finding any support."

Former President George W. Bush supported AIDS prevention efforts globally, but it was the Obama administration that launched the push to make lesbian, gay, bisexual and transgender rights an international issue. The watershed moment came in December 2011, when then-Secretary of State Hillary Clinton went to the United Nations in Geneva and proclaimed LGBT rights "one of the remaining human rights challenges of our time."

Since then, embassies have been opening their doors to gay rights activists, hosting events and supporting local advocacy work. The State Department has since spent $12 million on the efforts in over 50 countries through the Global Equality Fund, an initiative launched to fund the new work.

Just weeks after the Supreme Court struck down parts of the Defense of Marriage Act last June, consular posts also began issuing immigrant visas to the same-sex spouses of gay Americans.

One beneficiary was Jake Lees, a 27-year-old Englishman who had been forced to spend long periods apart from his American partner, Austin Armacost, since they met six years ago. In May Lees was issued a fiance visa at the U.S. Embassy in London. The couple married two weeks ago and are now starting a new life together in Franklin, Indiana, as they wait for Lees' green card.

"I felt like the officers at the embassy treated us the way they would treat a heterosexual couple," said Armacost, a 26-year-old fitness and nutrition instructor. "It's a mind-boggling change after gay couples were treated like legal strangers for the first three centuries of our country's history."

Some conservative American groups are outraged by the policy. Brian Brown, president of the National Organization for Marriage, calls it "a slap in the face to the majority of Americans," given that American voters have rejected same-sex marriage in a number of state referendums.

"This is taking a flawed view of what it means to be a human being — male and female — and trying to impose that on countries throughout the world," Brown said. "The administration would like people to believe that this is simply 'live and let live.' No, this is coercion in its worst possible form."

The American efforts are tailored to local conditions, said Scott Busby, the deputy assistant secretary for the Bureau of Democracy, Human Rights, and Labor at the State Department. Ambassadors can decide individually whether to hoist the rainbow flag, as embassies in Tel Aviv, London and Prague have done, or show support in other ways.

The official U.S. delegation to the recent Winter Olympics in Russia included three openly gay athletes. Soon after that the U.S. Embassy in Moscow opened its basketball court for the Open Games, an LGBT sporting event which had been denied access to many of the venues it had counted on. The U.S. Embassy also operates a website where Russian gay and lesbians can publish their personal stories.

While some gay rights activists say support from the U.S. and other Western countries adds moral legitimacy to their cause, it can also cause a backlash.

Rauda Morcos, a prominent Palestinian lesbian activist, said local communities, particularly in the Middle East, have to find their own ways of asserting themselves. She criticized the U.S. and Western efforts in general to help gay communities elsewhere as patronizing.

"It is a colonial approach," she said. "In cases where it was tried, it didn't help local communities and maybe made things even worse."

An extreme case has been Uganda, which in February passed a law making gay sex punishable by a life sentence. In enacting the bill, President Yoweri Museveni said he wanted to deter the West from "promoting" gay rights in Africa, a continent where homosexuals face severe discrimination and even attacks. In response, the U.S. imposed sanctions and Secretary of State John Kerry compared the policies to the anti-Semitic laws in Nazi Germany and apartheid in South Africa.

In Russia, President Vladimir Putin has waged an assault on what he considers the encroachment of decadent Western values and the government last year banned "propaganda of nontraditional sexual relations among minors," making it a crime to hold gay rights rallies or to openly discuss homosexuality in content accessible to children. Afraid for their security, some Russian gay advocates try to keep their contacts with Western officials quiet.

Jessica Stern, executive director of the International Gay and Lesbian Human Rights Commission, praised the U.S. policy but said there have been missteps along the way, citing a 2011 U.S. embassy gathering in Pakistan that prompted a group of religious and political leaders to accuse the U.S. of "cultural terrorism."

And in Senegal a year ago, President Macky Sall bluntly rebuked the visiting Obama for urging African leaders to end discrimination against gays. Sall said his country was neither homophobic nor ready to legalize homosexuality, and in an apparent jab at the U.S., he noted Senegal abolished capital punishment years ago.

"The response in the local press was voluminous praise of the Senegalese president, maybe not actually for his stance on LGBT rights, but for effectively asserting Senegal's sovereignty, yet the two became intertwined," Stern said.

Busby, the State Department official, denied that increased harassment by governments is ever the consequence of U.S. advocacy, instead describing it as "a cynical reaction taken by leaders to advance their own political standing."

In some countries, like Poland, the U.S. efforts are a catalyst for change.

The embassy there financed a 2012 visit to Warsaw by Dennis and Judy Shepard, the parents of Matthew Shepard, a gay Wyoming college student who was tortured and murdered in 1998.

A group of parents who heard their story were so shaken by the Shepards' tragedy that they founded a parental advocacy group, Akceptacja, which is fighting homophobia. The parents are now reaching out to their lawmakers personally, in what advocates say is the conscious adoption of an American strategy of families of gays and lesbians appealing to the hearts of officials.

"The killing of Matthew Shepard represents the fear I have that my son could be hurt for being gay," said Tamara Uliasz, 60, one of the group's founders. "I realized that what happened in Wyoming could happen here."


Associated Press writers Ezequiel Abiu Lopez in Santo Domingo, Dominican Republic; Rodney Muhumuza in Kampala, Uganda; and Jan M. Olsen in Copenhagen, Denmark, contributed to this report.

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